Category - Server

The Demise of SMB 1 in the Windows Stack

With the passing of support for Windows 2003, something else quietly fades into the background… Support for SMB 1.

My good friend Matt McSpirit has an issue with a file copy between servers in a datacenter. While daydreaming of it’s completion – his mind wanders and encounters three members of the engineering team who supported the SMB 1 stack on Windows Server.

Now that Windows Server 2003 is end of life, you should check out the goodness of SMB 3.x and above at http://aka.ms/serverstorage and http://aka.ms/smb

Thanks goes out to Ned (@nerdpyle), Greg, Dave and Matt (@MattMcSpirit) for helping put this one together!

Interview with Jeffrey Snover: Windows Server Futures

One of the cool things I get to do (and I am still giddy about) is to get the opportunity to have a chat / interview with the likes of a Distinguished Engineer and lead architect for Windows Server and System Center – Jeffrey Snover.

My friends in the UK Subsidiary of Microsoft were holding their TechDays Online event and wanted me to act as a host / facilitator for Jeffrey’s keynote.

Who am I to turn down such an opportunity?

Tune in to hear what Jeffrey has to say and get a glimpse into what we’re planning for the next release.

Everything you need to know about What’s New in Microsoft Azure

…or maybe “How the H-E-Double-Hockey-Sticks do you keep up with What’s New in Azure?” would be better. 😉

 It’s just about an impossible feat to accomplish – based on the number of teams working on this massive thing called “Microsoft Azure”, all with a cadence of what seems like 1-2 weeks…

Welcome to the world of “The Cloud”. As Mark Russinovich said to me during an interview at TechEd:

“In order to go fast in a cloud world, you actually have to go fast”

He wasn’t joking.

Part of what I do for my Job at Microsoft is talk about technologies in a specific area in context of the bigger picture of the IT Industry. I work with various Engineering / product teams to understand their technologies and how it would apply to solve issues in “the real world”. I used to focus exclusively on the core infrastructure of Windows Server. Over the last couple of years I decided to expand that focus to include Microsoft Azure. But wait, Azure is a big place – lots of innovation in all sorts of areas. How do I narrow it down? I focus my effort on technologies and solutions using Azure that would be beneficial for IT Professionals and SysAdmins to  bring into their organizations to be more successful.

Besides talking and meeting with the Teams here on Campus – one of the best places to find out what is new is via the official Azure Blog.  I find I tend to focus just on Virtual Machines and supporting technologies categories (View all posts in Virtual Machines).  From there, I dug up my “top 3” things from the past year that I thought I’d share with you here:

#3) D Series Machines – with SSD

As we roll out new hardware in our datacenters around the world, we are able to offer up new capabilities to our services. Virtual Machines is no exception to that. As a result – we get a new series of machines that have faster processing power, better memory to core ratio and faster disk options. Introducing The D-Series Machines.

Name vCores Memory (GB) Local SSD (GB)
Standard_D1 1 3.5 50
Standard_D2 2 7 100
Standard_D3 4 14 200
Standard_D4 8 28 400
Standard_D11 2 14 100
Standard_D12 4 28 200
Standard_D13 8 56 400
Standard_D14 16 112 800

Get more information about them, what they can do and how to use them (as well as pricing links) from the Azure Blog. http://azure.microsoft.com/blog/2014/09/22/new-d-series-virtual-machine-sizes

#2) ExpressRoute and other VPN solutions

When I talk about “The Cloud” and Microsoft Azure with anyone, I always make sure to do it as an AND conversation, not an OR conversation.  I see the Public Cloud as an extra tool you can use in your toolbox when designing architecture for new or existing projects.  It’s an AND, mainly because of our connectivity options AND existing skillsets. 

HybridOptions

VPN Connectivity could mean a point-to-site discussion for a specific box that is located on-prem or it could be a Site-to-Site connectivity option to truly act as an extension of your on-premises environment.  We announced in May 2014 the addition of what we’re calling ExpressRoute connectivity to select datacenters. Think of this as your internet provider with whom you already have WAN connectivity or Internet connectivity with now having the option to route traffic directly into an Azure Datacenter instead of going across the public internet. 

ExpressRoute1

Want to know more? Check out these posts from Ganesh:

#1) – Azure Site Recovery in General Availability

Think of this scenario for a minute.  You are working with SystemCenter on-premises to define your “clouds” of VMs managed by System Center Virtual Machine Manager.  You want to enable a level of disaster recovery that you currently can’t have, because you only have one Datacenter.  You can now use Azure as your second site and replicate them (provided they are Generation 1VMs) up to Microsoft Azure – using Azure Site Recovery.

DRtoAzureGA

Not only is this useful for Disaster Recovery – it could also be used to spin off isolated development environments or as a method of migration from on premises to Azure IaaS… I’ll be honest – it’s a bit tricky to setup and has some hefty requirements on the on-premises side (SystemCenter), but it’s a very attractive option for some DR goodness.

My friend Abhishek has a good starting point for you to research how to enable this… http://azure.microsoft.com/blog/2014/10/02/disaster-recovery-to-azure-using-azure-site-recovery-is-now-ga/ It’s something I also plan on documenting in a simpler format here on the blog.

There you have it – my “Top 3” things that I’ve found interesting from the past year. What about you – got anything that you find particularly useful to share in the Azure space? Any cool sources – share theme here in the comments!

Get the Windows Server Technical Preview bits

October 1st, 2014 marks the release of the “IT Pro” Focused version of Windows 10 from the client perspective.  I am sure you have seen all the tweets / social media / blog posts / press releases all over the place. As a “Server Hugger”, I’m more interested in the Windows Server Technical Preview – which released the same day. I thought I’d share my experiences of getting ready to evaluate Windows Server TP and what I did to get setup.

  1. If you haven’t already – GO SIGN UP FOR THE WINDOWS 10 TECHNICAL PREVIEW for the Enterprise Client… once you have done that, you can start the DL and prep your administrative workstation.  Like all Administrators – you should be managing your servers REMOTELY using RSAT tools – which are client and server version specific.
  2. Next Up – you will need the Windows Server TP RSAT tools – which you can grab from here. remember – I mentioned above – they are Client and Server specific…
  3. Now for the Bits – Windows Server Technical Preview. Well – at the time of writing, they are trickling out.  The official announcement blog post for Windows Server TP and System Center TP can be found HERE.  From that post:

Windows Server Technical Preview

System Center Technical Preview

But wait – say you don’t want to wait to download – or you want to DO something while you are waiting for the download to finish? Check out the Microsoft Azure Gallery Image that was released today for Windows Server TP.  It’s all setup and ready to deploy!

How? Get yourself setup on a 30 day trial of Azure and create a new VM from gallery – Windows Server Technical Preview, October 2014 is a selectable option in the Windows Server image gallery.

AzureWindowsServerTechnicalPreview

Reminder: These are not final – even for evaluation. Don’t use them in production. Features and capabilities will be evolving over the course of the TP, so don’t take everything you see in the TP as being final if you are evaluating a technology.

Lastly – Here is where I go for all the top level “Things I should be trying out….”  The TechNet Library.  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn765472.aspx

  • What’s New in Active Directory Federation Services. Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) in Windows Server Technical Preview includes new features that enable you to configure AD FS to authenticate users stored in Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) directories. For more information, see Active Directory Federation Services Overview.
  • What’s new for Hyper-V in the Technical Preview. This topic explains the new and changed functionality of the Hyper-V role in Windows Server Technical Preview, Client Hyper-V running on Windows 10 Technical Preview, and Microsoft Hyper-V Server Technical Preview.
  • Windows Defender Overview. Windows Defender is installed and enabled by default in Windows Server Technical Preview, but the user interface for Windows Defender is not installed. However, Windows Defender will update antimalware definitions and protect the computer without the user interface. If you need the user interface for Windows Defender, you can install it after the operating system installation by using the Add Roles and Features Wizard.
  • What’s New in Remote Desktop Services in the Windows Server Technical Preview. For the Windows Server Technical Preview, the Remote Desktop Services team focused on improvements based on customer requests. We added support for OpenGL and OpenCL applications, and added MultiPoint Services as a new role in Windows Server.
  • What’s New in Storage Services in Windows Server Technical Preview. This topic explains the new and changed functionality of Storage Services. An update in storage quality of service now enables you to create storage QoS policies on a Scale-Out File Server and assign them to one or more virtual disks on Hyper-V virtual machines. Storage Replica is a new feature that enables synchronous replication between servers for disaster recovery, as well as stretching of a failover cluster for high availability..
  • What’s New in Failover Clustering in Windows Server Technical Preview. This topic explains the new and changed functionality of Failover Clustering. A Hyper-V or Scale-out File Server failover cluster can now easily be upgraded without any downtime or need to build a new cluster with nodes that are running Windows Server Technical Preview.
  • What’s New in Web Application Proxy. Web Application Proxy now supports preauthentication for applications using the HTTP Basic protocol, wildcards in external URLS of applications, redirection from HTTP to HTTPS, use of pass-through authentication with HTTP applications, publishing of Remote Desktop Gateway apps, a new debug log, propagation of client IP addresses to backend applications, and improvements to the Administrator console.
  • What’s New in Windows PowerShell 5.0. Windows PowerShell 5.0 includes significant new features—including support for developing with classes, and new security features—that extend its use, improve its usability, and allow you to control and manage Windows-based environments more easily and comprehensively. Multiple new features in Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) are also described in this topic.
  • What’s New in Networking in Windows Server Technical Preview. With this topic you can discover information about new networking technologies, such as Network Controller and Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) Tunneling, and new features for existing technologies, including IP Address Management (IPAM), DNS, and DHCP.

Go out there, try them out – and PLAY SAFE.

Stop the insanity, regain control of user management and security

Sometime it’s the fundamentals that get missed when you are in FireDrill mode for too long and need to get things done. Or maybe you inherited a fileserver where there are WAY too many admins and you are troubleshooting access issues. Take a moment, step back and revisit the basics of Group strategies and how they should be applied to all sorts of scenarios. You have to understand the history before you can start with the new stuff.

Wait a second. You’re talking about everyday boring groups? Those things you use to group users together so that you can assign access rights to resources? How is this going to help me regain control of users? Let me share a story.

WP_20140506_08_33_02_ProRecently I inherited a Clustered FileServer that had a couple of thousand users who accessed resources from many, many domains across this international Active Directory forest. Upon further examination, the use of groups WAS employed (poorly), but only ONE GROUP was created. This group gave whoever was a member “Full Control” of the file permissions down through the entire folder structure on the server.  On top of that – it was used across a dozen different shares, accessed by different groups of users across the entire organization. This fileserver was running on aging hardware, constantly getting “full” and was due for a swap to a new solution. How do I handle this while continuing to work on my regular day job?

Procuring the new hardware was easy.

CiB-9220_Top_Banner_Demo_2

I ordered up a nice 70 terabyte Cluster-In-A-Box from DataOnStorage and got it setup as a Clustered Fileserver. After establishing a large DrivePool and carving out a new Dual Parity StorageSpace – I set about doing some basic Group planning for future access.

Every SysAdmin has their own philosophy on how to assign access rights to shares and folder permissions. There have been some enhancements with Windows Server 2012 R2, but fundamentally things have not changed all that much (A,G,DL,P):

Assign users into
Global Groups. Nest them inside
Domain Local groups and Assign
Permissions to the share / folder structure.

Why do I bring this up? You would be surprised at the number of times I’ve see ACLs (Access Control Lists) for folders / shares that have individual users added directly added to them. Usually as a result of someone granting Full Control to a non technical person (who has no background in managing servers) and them getting a little too advanced for themselves by  changing file permissions, only to “Apply this to all files and sub folders”.

Do yourself a favor. Please explain this concept to anyone who will be managing a folder structure or share on a server. DON’T MAKE THE ASSUMPTION that they know what you are talking about. But also explain to them about reusing groups where it makes sense and possibly “mail enabling” groups in order to make them multi-purposed.  A well managed AD with an understood and communicated Group Strategy will go a LONG way to keep your sanity, keep the users in line and reign in wayward file servers.

That migration project for the file server?  It’s almost done. I’ve practiced what I’ve preached here and contacted the respective owners of the various shares to re-confirm what their requested level of security is.  I’ve create groups and nested them inside local groups on the new server. I’ve also “trained” the owner of the shares what groups are being used and I’ve delegated them the rights to go an manage the group memberships to ultimately control who has access to the resources. I’ve setup some RoboCopy command scripts to copy over data and synchronize  data.  I’m almost ready to flip the switch – just got to get back from my travels on the road and send out the notification emails.

I think some of the follow up from the final process would make a good couple of posts. Stay tuned for more.

If you can’t wait and need to make sometime to figure out what’s coming around the bend  – check out the new EvalCenter with it’s concept of “Tech Journeys” and explore some Hybrid datacenter concepts or Mobile Device Management. .

Need a quick lab/sandbox to try out MSFT technologies?

One of the best parts of my job is talking with IT Professionals / SysAdmins / Students from all over. It doesn’t matter if they are independent IT consultants, staffers / lifers at “company x” or someone just getting started in the IT field – they all at some point ask me about “spinning up a lab” for one thing or another.

That’s when I let them in on a little secret: The Microsoft Virtual Labs Experience.

image

I use our Virtual Lab Experience when I need to quickly get something up and running. Why?

  • It’s a virtualized Sandbox that can be yours to play in for the duration of the lab time – FOR FREE.
  • It comes with a pre-defined lab including step by step instructions that allows you to test drive all sorts of Microsoft Technologies and solutions
  • Better yet, even though it comes pre-configured – you are NOT RESTRICTED on what you can do within it!

(Yes – I am encouraging you to colour outside the lines)

What can you find in this plethora of sandboxes (as one size does not fit all)? Just over 500+ Hands On labs most providing 2 hours of lab access!!! 60+ labs from TechEd North America 2013 were just posted earlier this week. More RTM updated labs with Windows Server 2012 R2 and System Center 2012 R2 were recently added as well.

You can mix and match which ones to try, select different technologies or scenarios for whatever tickles your fancy. You can even rate the labs and sort them by most popular or most relevant to your searches. Heck – you can get social and share out what environments you are trying out with your various social networks.

Being that I am very passionate about the Windows Server 2012 R2 stack, here is one more tip. You can get a good “trial” by registering to kick the tires with a simple 4 part series:

  1. Windows Server 2012 R2 – Configuring and Managing Servers
  2. Windows Server 2012 R2 – Storage Infrastructure
  3. Windows Server 2012 R2 – Network Automation using IPAM
  4. Windows Server 2012 R2 – Exploring Hyper-V Server

Check out the labs and start giving the team your feedback and opinions using the post-lab survey. They are just down the hall, tell them I sent ya.

If you are like me and are curious by nature about how all this back end virtualization works… check out this interview I snagged with Corey Hynes, architect from HOL systems. They are the guys and gals who host this virtual lab experience for us.

 

They have a very cool Windows Server powered solution that handles all the heavy lifting to get these spun up on demand when you click on “Launch Lab”.

How To: Delete windows.old from Windows Server 2012 R2

I’ve been updating my various environments from Windows Server 2012 RTM or Preview releases (build 9431) of Windows Server 2012 R2 to the final bits. On some boxes I just use my scortched earth policy of leveling the partitions and starting from scratch – others I will do an install and use the same partition. You get the following dreaded message – which you dismiss and move on.

image

Sure – I’ll just go and delete that directory after a while and go about my merry way.

Unfortunately it is not that easy.

In Windows client environments, you can just kick off a “disk cleanup” routine and have it removed – saving you a dozen or more GB of space. Unfortunately, that Disk Cleanup does not exist in Windows Server 2012 / 2012 R2 Full GUI install, unless you add Desktop Experience.

image

Fear not. Once you have confirmed you need nothing from that old c:windows.old directory structure, you can manually delete it, with a little bit of extra effort.

Here’s how you do it.

1) Download Junction.EXE from Sysinternals. I extracted and saved it to c:source. You will use this tool to generate a list of all the junctions that have to be removed.

2) create a reference file that lists all the junction points and symbolic links in use by opening up a command prompt, changing into C:source and running

junction.exe –s –q c:windows.old >junctions.txt

3) open up PowerShell ISE administrator rights and run the following script to remove all symbolic links and junction points in c:windows.old.

foreach ($line in [System.IO.File]::ReadLines(“c:sourcejunctions.txt”))
{
if ($line -match “^\\”)
{
$file = $line -replace “(: JUNCTION)|(: SYMBOLIC LINK)”,””
& c:sourcejunction.exe -d “$file”
}
}

You should get the following scrolling by…

image

Now it’s some simple taking of ownership, granting rights and deleting windows.old to get your space back.

4) to take ownership use

takeown /F C:windows.old /R /D Y

5) delete c:windows.old – you now have permissions and ownership.

How much space you get back will change based on your particular situation.  My last run at this saved me 15.5 GB of space on my OS drive.

Note: Kudos to Peter Hahndorf’s response on ServerFault.com on which this article was based.

Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V guest IOps and network portability demos

I have the good fortune of working with some great folks here at Microsoft HQ – some of which I have been following for quite some time. Last week at TechEd NorthAmerica Jeff Woolsey was on the main keynote stage demonstrating a whirlwind of functionalities and achievements of the next generation of Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012. I’ve pulled out two things that interest me VERY much I thought I’d share.

Specifically – the VM Guest capability of getting 3x the IO throughput via the new virtual HBA adapters then VMware guests can get.  We almost hit 1 million IOps with this demo on stage, but I swear I saw it over a million in rehearsal that morning and the night before.

Also of interest is the IP portability demo that was part of the TechEd North America and Europe “foundation” session I produced. It was called “Modernizing your Datacenter” which was well received. Taking the keyboard for the demo is my friend Michael Leworthy to show us what Windows Server 2012 and System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012 can do for scenarios like Hosters or Mergers and Acquisitions.

TechEd Foundation Session: Modernizing Your Datacenter resources

techEdHeaderLogoGreetings!

As the curator of the TechEd Modernizing Your Datacenter foundational session, I have compiled a one stop resource to complementary sessions about the technologies we demonstrated during the event.  You can click on the links to view the session details in schedule builder.

If you are coming across this post AFTER TechEd 2012 has come and gone – don’t worry – there are recordings of each of these sessions you should be able to watch online.

Thanks for stopping by – keep coming back if you are a Windows Server 2012 geek like me.

Rick

Section One: Build and scale your infrastructure

VIR308 – What’s New in Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, Part 1

Speaker(s): Jeff Woolsey
Monday, June 11 at 3:00 PM – 4:15 PM in S310A

This two-part session overviews the new and updated features for Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, including Multitenancy, High Availability, flexibility infrastructure, and Scale and Density. Over the two sessions, it provides a complete summary of why Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V is the best virtualization platform for server consolidation, key workload support and VDI, as well as the ideal platform for Infrastructure as a Service, including Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Public Cloud. #TEVIR308

VIR309 – What’s New in Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, Part 2

Speaker(s): Jeff Woolsey
Monday, June 11 at 4:45 PM – 6:00 PM in S310A

Building on Part 1, the second part of What’s new in Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V continues to show a complete summary of why Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V is the best virtualization platform for server consolidation, key workload support and VDI, as well as the ideal platform for Infrastructure as a Service, including Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Public Cloud. #TEVIR309

VIR305 – Hyper-V Network Virtualization for Scalable Multi-Tenancy in Windows

Speaker(s): Sandeep Singhal
Thursday, June 14 at 10:15 AM – 11:30 AM in S320A

“Any service at any server in any cloud.” Next generation data centers should allow dynamic resource allocation and consolidation across large resource pools. The topological constrains of today’s data center networks limit how services can be assigned to servers. Windows Server 2012 enables you to create an agile, multi-tenant cloud on top of your existing infrastructure by virtualizing the network. Network virtualization decouples server configuration from network configuration to provide a virtual dedicated network to each tenant. This allows seamless migration of workloads, while continuing to provide security isolation between tenants. Partners have the opportunity to become multi-tenancy aware and provide the next generation of services, devices, appliances, both physical and virtual, to augment and complete the Windows offering to build secure, scalable, multi-tenant public and private clouds. #TEVIR305

Section Two: Deploy applications and services

WSV332 – What’s New with Internet Information Services (IIS) 8: Performance, Scalability, and Security

Speaker(s): Robert McMurray
Thursday, June 14 at 2:45 PM – 4:00 PM in N310

The session focuses on the new performance, scalability, and security features that are available in IIS 8, including how IIS scales on modern hardware, offers additional security via dynamic rules, and manages the end-user expectations on the age old question, “why does the first request take a long time on IIS?” #TEWSV332

WSV42-HOL – Exploring Application Scale and Management Enhancements in IIS 8

All week in Hands On Labs area in S. Hall B

The lab steps through the key SSL investments in next version of IIS. Learn about how to configure SNI (Server Name Indication) and manage the certificate quickly and securely by keeping them in a central location. This lab is particularly relevant for those who manage many secure sites in a server farm.

MGT304 – Cloud? It’s All about the App!

Speaker(s): Maarten Goet
Wednesday, June 13 at 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM in N220A

The applications to empower our businesses are what we should focus on. We should choose the platform to host the application that best meets the needs, whether it’s a public cloud (Windows Azure) or a private cloud (Hyper-V). In this session Maarten Goet, five-year Microsoft System Center MVP, shows how System Center can help you make those choices and provides integrated management for all cloud worlds. He demonstrates Hyper-V with System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012 and System Center App Controller 2012 with Azure and provides you with a practical approach to embracing the right cloud for your application. #TEMGT304

Section Three: Manage  and maintain availability

WSV205 – Windows Server 2012 Overview

Speaker(s): Michael Leworthy
Monday, June 11 at 1:15 PM – 2:30 PM in N320A

Windows Server 2012 brings Microsoft’s experience building and operating public clouds to the server operating system, making it a dynamic, highly available, and cost-effective platform for private clouds and on-premise datacenters. It can take you Beyond Virtualization while offering The Power of Many Servers, and the Simplicity of One. It helps with Every App, Any Cloud, and offers to help Enable the Modern Work Style. Learn what we mean by all that and furthermore, experience this in a number of demos showing exciting new features and scenarios. #TEWSV205

WSV306 – Inside Windows Server 2012 Multi-Server Management Capabilities

Speaker(s): Erin Chapple, Jeffrey Snover
Tuesday, June 12 at 10:15 AM – 11:30 AM in N310

Windows Server 2012 will offer excellent total cost of ownership as an integrated platform with comprehensive, multicomputer manageability. Two areas in which Windows Server 2012 improves multicomputer management are Server Manager and Windows PowerShell 3.0. Server Manager in Windows Server 2012 helps you efficiently deploy and manage roles and features on the local server, on remote servers, and on both online and offline virtual hard disks. It also provides a multiserver experience where you can centralize your Windows Server management in a single view, and streamlined your server configuration and deployment from the same window. Windows PowerShell 3.0 provides an extensive platform to help you manage server roles and automate management tasks. With access to over 2300 commandlets (a tenfold increase from the previous version), Windows PowerShell 3.0 offers comprehensive management across your datacenter. This session overviews these subjects in detail and prepares you for enhancing your management capability. #TEWSV306

WSV322 – Update Management in Windows Server 2012: Revealing Cluster-Aware Updating and the New Generation of WSUS

Speaker(s): Erin Chapple, Mallikarjun Chadalapaka
Wednesday, June 13 at 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM in S230E

Today, patch management is a required component of any security strategy. In Windows Server 2012, the new Cluster-Aware Updating (CAU) feature delivers Continuous Availability through automated self-updating of failover clusters. In Windows Server 2012, Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) has evolved to become a Server Role with exciting new capabilities. This session introduces CAU with a discussion of its GUI, cmdlets, remote-updating and self-updating capabilities. And then we proceed to highlight the main functionalities of WSUS in Windows Server 2012 including the security enhancements, patch deployment automation, and new Windows PowerShell cmdlets to perform maintenance, manage and deploy updates. #TEWSV322

Section Four: Securely Deliver Services to Devices

SIA207 – Windows Server 2012 Dynamic Access Control Overview

Speaker(s): Gunjan Jain, Nir Ben Zvi
Monday, June 11 at 4:45 PM – 6:00 PM in N320E

This session provides an overview of the new Dynamic Access Control capabilities built into Windows Server 2012 and how it can best be leveraged for Compliance and Data Leakage Prevention to enable Data Governance. Administrators now have greater control over file server data by leveraging Active Directory claims, a more robust ACL model, Active Directory centralized authorization/auditing policy, and data classification. This session provides an overview of the principal Dynamic Access Control scenarios, showcases the data classification toolkit and integrated partner solutions, and provides a foundation for the Dynamic Access Control breakout sessions. #TESIA207

SIA341 – Windows Server 2012 Dynamic Access Control Deep Dive for Active Directory and Central Authorization Policies

Speaker(s): Siddharth Bhai
Tuesday, June 12 at 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM in N220A

How does Dynamic Access Control affect Active Directory Domain Services? Come to this session and find out how it works! This session provides a technical deep-dive on Dynamic Access Control specifically targeted to the AD Administrator. Topics include the mechanics of Active Directory claims, central access policies, new authentication and authorization capabilities, the latest guidance on AD token bloat, and more. #TESIA405

SIA21-HOL – Using Dynamic Access Control to Automatically and Centrally Secure Data in Windows Server 2012

Available all week in Hands On Labs area in S. Hall B

In this lab, explore Dynamic Access Control in Windows Server 2012. Learn how to create Central Access Policies, explore the new Access Denied Remediation features, as well as how to utilize the audit capabilities built into Dynamic Access Control.

Free (as in beer) Windows Server 2012 training

imageI’ve been working with Windows Server “8” since last September when it first peeked outside of the internal deployment servers at the Build conference. Because I was not part of the engineering group or product team – I had the same level of access all the rest of the public had.  Time moved forward and things changed in January when I moved to “The Mother Ship” and joined the Corp Evangelism team. A little more access, but mostly connections to some really smart people talking quite candidly about Windows Server “8” and the upcoming Beta release. Now it’s getting even closer with an RC coming around the corner soon.

I believe it’s time to take this to the next level and share the goodness that is Windows Server 2012.

Are you ready for some serious pay dirt on Windows Server 2012? Are you ready to evolve your Datacenter (regardless of it’s size) and your skills to a new level of capabilities?

I’ve created and will be delivering a 2 day online FREE event with Microsoft Learning called a JumpStart.  It’s going to take place on June 20th and 21st in-between TechEd North America and TechEd Europe. I recruited my good friend Corey Hynes to help deliver this monster of a online event and will have a plethora of help from product teams, IT geeks and helpers all around answering questions and interacting in the live chat room. In short – it’s going to be an all around Windows Server 2012 party my friends!

Here’s the official write up.

Windows Server 2012:
Preparing for the Datacenter Evolution

Windows Server 2012 provides a dynamic, highly available and cost-effective server platform for the modern datacenter and the cloud. Its impact scales from a few servers all the way to multitenant-aware, multisite environments in the largest organizations. Windows Server 2012 is one of the most significant releases of Windows Server to date, and there is a vast number of new features in this release that will enable you to Cloud-Optimize your IT.

Leveraging the popular “Jump Start” virtual classroom approach, Microsoft Senior Technical Evangelist Rick Claus and Microsoft Partner Corey Hynes will walk you through their personal favorite feature sets while answering why and how each one will have a positive impact on improving your day-to-day IT environment. These accelerated, engaging and demo-heavy sessions are guaranteed to get you excited and ready to try them yourself.

We’re loosely going to be breaking this up into for chunks over two days. The breakdown is organized into the following categories:

  • Beyond Virtualization
  • Manageability
  • Storage technology
  • Remote access / networking

Go check out the registration page for more details on what is being covered from a technology perspective.

Register Here

Did I mention it’s Free (as in beer)?


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Fatal error: Uncaught WindowsAzure\Common\ServiceException: Fail: Code: 400 Value: The account being accessed does not support http. details (if any): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><Error><Code>AccountRequiresHttps</Code><Message>The account being accessed does not support http. RequestId:b866e601-f01e-008e-3abf-c687ee000000 Time:2021-10-21T21:07:26.0286809Z</Message><AccountName>ritgcache</AccountName></Error>. in D:\home\site\wwwroot\wp-content\plugins\projectnami-blob-cache\library\WindowsAzure\Common\Internal\Http\HttpClient.php:382 Stack trace: #0 D:\home\site\wwwroot\wp-content\plugins\projectnami-blob-cache\library\WindowsAzure\Common\Internal\Http\HttpClient.php(275): WindowsAzure\Common\Internal\Http\HttpClient::throwIfError(400, 'The account bei...', '\xEF\xBB\xBF<?xml versio...', Array) #1 D:\home\site\wwwroot\wp-content\plugins\projectnami-blob-cache\library\WindowsAzure\Common\Internal\RestProxy.php(141): WindowsAzure\Common\Internal\Http\HttpClient->send(Array, Object(WindowsAzure\Common\Internal\ in D:\home\site\wwwroot\wp-content\plugins\projectnami-blob-cache\library\WindowsAzure\Common\Internal\Http\HttpClient.php on line 382