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Azure – Page 10 – Regular IT guy

Category - Azure

What is the Largest and Fastest VM in the public cloud?

I shot a video with Mark Russinovich demoin’ the awesomesauce that is the new variant of our G Series of VMs up in Azure: the new GS series.  If you know a thing or two around our current naming convention – the “S” refers to Premium Storage capable.  The GS variant of VMs is like the Peanut Butter and Jelly of performance in the public cloud world – Biggest compute core / RAM sizes paired up with the “bacon of the datacenter” SSD backed storage.  Then you add in the NIC speeds between VMs and you have the trifecta of performance: Compute, Storage and Networking.

Note: Since this is “the cloud” we’re talking about, this is as of September 2nd, 2015.  It is a leapfrog game of size, scale and performance for all players.  Before you go off saying “these guys have more cores” – read the fine print… Our compute cores are Non Hyper Threaded cores for faster performance instead of splitting cores and sharing cycles to get more perceived cores at penalty of performance.

Enough of me talking about it… check out Mark in this video.

Looking for more info on all this goodness? Corey Sanders have you covered over on the azure.com site… http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/azure-has-the-most-powerful-vms-in-the-public-cloud/

Tuesdays with Corey: The Mark Russinovich episode and Announcements.

Corey Sanders, Director of Program Management on the Microsoft Azure Compute team talks to the tall guy with great hair – Mark Russinovich… Well… actually he doesn’t – Mark couldn’t make it.

Don’t forget – we’re always looking for Suggestions and Questions here in the comments section OR via twitter #AzureTwC. You never know – you might make it to an upcoming episode and be a virtual star of the show – like THIS one!

Post any questions, topic ideas or general conversation here in the comments OR online on via Twitter.

Tuesdays with Corey: Classic vs ARM – what up with that?

Corey Sanders, Director of Program Management on the Microsoft Azure Compute team answers a common question he gets regarding when to use “Classic” Azure services vs “Resource Manager” ARM templates.

Some of the URLs that came up in this show:

Don’t forget – we’re always looking for Suggestions and Questions here in the comments section OR via twitter #AzureTwC. You never know – you might make it to an upcoming episode and be a virtual star of the show – like THIS one!

Post any questions, topic ideas or general conversation here in the comments OR online on via Twitter.

Configure AzureCLI to work with OrgID on Mac / Linux

I looked up from a customer presentation earlier today and saw a sea of “fruit” beacon lights staring at me from the audience. In the past I would have been concerned as I would have had to qualify what works and what doesn’t work with “technology X” or “Service Y” on a non Microsoft platform.

I don’t have to worry about that anymore – things have changed. <phew>

If you are a Microsoft technology person and you want to interact at scale with Azure services, your tool of choice is probably going to be PowerShell with ARM (Azure Resource Manager) templates. If you are a NON-Microsoft technology person, you probably don’t want to spin up a windows VM just to run PowerShell to get stuff done.  You should be using AzureCLI.

But wait – we came across an issue with trying to authenticate against an Azure subscription using a “Microsoft Account” (formerly known as LiveID) like in an MSDN subscription or a Free Trial – things work great from the Azure Portal.  It’s not so great from AzureCLI – it errors out.  Why? You need to use an OrgID, not MSFT account.  There is a link to a generic AzureCLI document which has another LINK on how to setup an OrgID for Mac/Linux.

AzureCLI

While it kinda makes sense – how about a SIMPLER video? I asked my friend Boris Baryshnikov to make one for me (as he uses a Mac and the AzureCLI more than I do). Have a look and solve your authentication issue TODAY.

Tuesdays with Corey: Chat with a Microsoft Datacenter Architect

Corey Sanders, Director of Program Management on the Microsoft Azure Compute team answers a request to talk about Datacenters. Not quite a tour, but just as cool… He talks with Principal Datacenter Architect Michael Sweeney about what’s up with our Datacenters.

 

Don’t forget – we’re always looking for Suggestions and Questions here in the comments section OR via twitter #AzureTwC. You never know – you might make it to an upcoming episode and be a virtual star of the show – like THIS one!

Post any questions, topic ideas or general conversation here in the comments OR online on via Twitter.

Tuesdays with Corey: Nano Server with Jeffrey Snover

Corey Sanders, Director of Program Management on the Windows Azure IaaS team meets up with the man, the myth, the legend – Jeffrey Snover and talks about Nano Server.

Don’t forget – we’re always looking for Suggestions and Questions here in the comments section OR via twitter #AzureTwC. You never know – you might make it to an upcoming episode and be a virtual star of the show – like THIS one!

Post any questions, topic ideas or general conversation here in the comments OR online on via Twitter.

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Tuesdays with Corey: Docker Con keynote goodness

Corey Sanders, Director of Program Management on the Windows Azure IaaS team talks about the announcements and demos Mark Russinovich pulled off while at DockerCon. Check out Corey’s Blog Post for full details on the announcements…

Don’t forget – we’re always looking for Suggestions and Questions here in the comments section OR via twitter #AzureTwC. You never know – you might make it to an upcoming episode and be a virtual star of the show – like THIS one!

Post any questions, topic ideas or general conversation here in the comments OR online on via Twitter.

PlayPlay

Debunking Azure Myths: Azure Doesn’t Scale up to large VMs

A lot of myths and misinformation is out there about what you can do with Microsoft Azure and what using Azure is like. I figured it was time to debunk some of these myths by talking to the engineering team to see what they have to say.

MYTH: Azure Doesn’t Scale up to large VMs

People believe that the compute power in Azure is not anywhere near cutting edge and built for performance that demanding workloads require. I know this just isn’t true, so I tracked down Kenaz Kwa, PM in the Azure IaaS Team to talk to him about all the options of compute families and what regions they are available in.

Check out the Azure VM Sizing and pricing page for details on VM sizes and region availability.

This is the Fourth video in a series of post about Debunking Azure Myths. Stay tuned for the next episode.

Tuesdays with Corey: A little somethin’ about Scale Sets

Corey Sanders, Director of Program Management on the Windows Azure IaaS team talks about Scale Sets and how they work in ARM templates and deliver pure scalable awesomesauce to your deployments.

Don’t forget – we’re always looking for Suggestions and Questions here in the comments section OR via twitter #AzureTwC. You never know – you might make it to an upcoming episode and be a virtual star of the show – like THIS one!

Post any questions, topic ideas or general conversation here in the comments OR online on via Twitter.

PlayPlay

Debunking Azure Myths: Azure doesn’t scale out to large and complex workloads

A lot of myths and misinformation is out there about what you can do with Microsoft Azure and what using Azure is like. I figured it was time to debunk some of these myths by talking to the engineering team to see what they have to say.

MYTH: Azure doesn’t scale out to large and complex workloads

People think that deploying large and complex workloads is a slow and cumbersome task on Azure.  You have to learn powerhsell and write complex scripts to accomplish serial tasks in order to get your app up and running on Azure. With the recent update to Azure Resource Manager now supporting declarative json files which include information on compute, storage and networking – this is definitely not the case.  I tracked down Mahesh Thiagarajan, Senior PM on the Azure IaaS Team to talk to me about the new template model and how it applies to complex workload deployment.

Check out this post by Corey Sanders about the public preview of template-based deployments of Compute, Storage and Networking.
This is the Third video in a series of posts about Debunking Azure Myths. Stay tuned for the next episode.


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